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Our Fund Raisers and Charities

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Alaska Smokejumpers Welfare Fund

Alaska Smokejumpers Welfare Fund

Fairbanks is home to the crew closest to Murry Taylor's heart! He jumped as an Alaska jumper from '73 through '78, then again from '88 through 2000--a total of 19 years.

Both Jumping Fire and this new book, More or Less Crazy, take place primarily in Alaska.

"I wrote about Alaska, because I lived Alaska," Murry will tell you.

When you purchase a book from this webpage, part of the proceeds (20%) go to support the base's welfare fund. The fund helps families of injured or deceased smokejumpers during times of crisis.

Boise Smokejumpers Welfare Fund

Boise Smokejumpers Welfare Fund

Boise is a Bureau of Land Management base and, while primarily jumping in the Great Basin, the crew also covers other bases during periods of excessive activity--especially in Alaska.

Murry jumped on this crew his first year back jumping--after eight years being out--in 1987. The next year, he returned to Fairbanks, Boise's sister base.

The Boise crew suffered a tragic loss in September, 2013 when Mark Urban died after his parachute failed to open on an experimental jump near Prairie, Idaho.

When you purchase a book using this link, part of the proceeds (20%) go to support the base welfare fund. The fund helps families of injured or deceased smokejumpers during times of need.

California Smokejumpers Welfare Fund

California Smokejumpers Welfare Fund

Based in Redding, this smokerjumper crew likes to be known as the California Smokejumpers.

Mr. Taylor was a rookie smokejumper there back in 1965. If you do the math, that comes to 50 years ago. He jumped there from '65 through '71, then went up to Alaska.

The California crew jumps some of the toughest and meanest jump country in the system. In accordance with old tradition, they invite old jumpers to rookie camp each spring and to their end-of-season parties as well.

This crew tragically lost one of their best two summers ago with the death of Luke Sheehy when a limb fell out of a burning snag on a fire on the Modoc National Forest. When I say "one of their best," I mean it.

When you purchase a book using this link, part of the proceeds (20%) go to support the base welfare fund. The fund helps families of injured or deceased smokejumpers during times of need.

Grangeville Smokejumpers Welfare Fund

Grangeville Smokejumpers Welfare Fund

This small but proud base is located in Grangeville, Idaho. The jump country here is massive with deep canyons, narrow high ridges and tough packouts.

When you purchase a book using this link, part of the proceeds (20%) go to support the base welfare fund. The fund helps families of injured or deceased smokejumpers during times of crisis.

McCall Smokejumpers Welfare Fund

McCall Smokejumpers Welfare Fund

McCall was one of the first jump bases after Missoula, starting in 1943. Located in stunning McCall, Idaho, this base has great heart and some of the most rugged, remote, and glorious back country right up through the backbone of the state, including the Gospel Hump and River of No Return Wildernesses.

When you purchase a book using this link, part of the proceeds (20%) go to support the base welfare fund. The fund helps families of injured or deceased smokejumpers during times of need.

A fire jump (the Avalanche fire) in More or Less Crazy takes place in Kootenai National Forest.

Missoula Smokejumpers Welfare Fund

Missoula Smokejumpers Welfare Fund

The Missoula base has a long and proud history, beginning in 1940 with Rufus Robinson and Earl Cooley making the first ever fire jump on Marten Creek of the Nez Perce National Forest.

In July of this year (2015) we will gather in Missoula to celebrate 75 Years of Smokejumping! Montana is some of the most beautiful and rugged jump country in the system including the heart of much of Central Idaho.

When you purchase a copy of More or Less Crazy using this link, part of the proceeds (20%) go to support the base welfare fund. The fund helps families of injured or fallen smokejumpers during times of crisis.

North Cascades Base Welfare Fund

North Cascades Base Welfare Fund

The North Cascades base in Winthrop, Washington is where smokejumping was born.

The first experimental jumps were made here in the summer of 1939. It was a bold move, few thought it a sane idea. Maybe they thought a smokejumper would have to be more ~ or less ~ crazy!

Four years later, smokejumping had proven itself a grand success with 125 jumpers jumping fires throughout the Northwest. The jump country is often rugged, beautiful and unforgiving.

Part of the story in More or Less Crazy takes place here late in the book. When you purchase a book using this link, part of the proceeds (20%) go to support the base welfare fund. Base welfare funds help families of injured or deceased smokejumpers during times of crisis.

Redmond Smokejumper's Welfare Fund

Redmond Smokejumper's Welfare Fund

The Redmond Smokejumper's Welfare fund helps families of injured or deceased smokejumpers during times of need.

When you purchase a book using this link, part of the proceeds (20%) goes to support the Redmond Smokejumper's welfare fund.

From Mr. Taylor, author

Redmond Oregon was one of my favorite bases to jump out of when we came down from Alaska. This go-for-it Oregon crew gets a bunch of beautiful jumps along the Cascade Crest. Redmond doesn't have a whole lot of bad--meaning seriously dangerous--jump country, although like all bases, it has some. So watch where you jump, because you will be taking all of its natural beauty in!

As a smokejumper himself, these types of funds are very close to the author's heart. Mr. Taylor and Books to Believe In are joining forces to donate 20% of the gross sales of this book to the Redmond Smokejumper's Welfare Fund.

Siskiyou Smokejumper Museum

Siskiyou Smokejumper Museum

This wonderful little museum in Cave Junction, Oregon, is a testimony of the big heart that lived and breathed here from 1943 until 1983 when the base was closed. For the next twenty years the buildings and grounds went through various stages of use and abuse. Then, when they faced being bulldozed and hauled away, the local jumpers who still lived in the area stepped forward and made their appeal to the Josephine Co. Board of Supervisors to restore the base as a historic museum. The rest is history. After thousands of hours of volunteer work and multiple levels of community cooperation the Siskiyou Smokejumper Museum stands proudly. The restoration of this base is, at its' heart, a love story. What happened at this base during its' best years endeared its' jumpers to it forever.

I jumped here as a booster jumper in the '60's and '70's, and while not a real "Gobi" jumper, feel very close to these people and their beloved Gobi. You can read all about on their webpage. When you purchase a book using this link, part of the proceeds (20%) go to support the museum, its' grounds, and now, the two old Twin Beach jumper aircraft.

To donate directly to the museum, click the link: http://www.siskiyousmokejumpermuseum.org/donate-museum

http://www.siskiyousmokejumpermuseum.org/donate-museum
West Yellowstone Smokejumper's Welfare Fund

West Yellowstone Smokejumper's Welfare Fund

In his twenty-seven seasons as a smokejumper, West Yellowstone is the one base that Murry didn't get to visit. Regrettable as they jump Yellowstone National Park which is some of the most beautiful country in the world.

West Yellowstone is a small base with a big heart and long history committed to protecting some of America's rarest animal populations and wild places.

When you purchase a copy of More or Less Crazy using this link, part of the proceeds (20%) go to support the base welfare fund. The fund helps families of injured or deceased smokejumpers during times of crisis.

Wildland Firefighters Foundation - Donation

Wildland Firefighters Foundation - Donation

The Wildland Firefighter Foundation assists those who have been killed or injured in the course of protecting our lands, our homes, and our property.

A portion of the sales from this book - More or Less Crazy - the Smokejumpers will be collected and donated to the Wildland Firefighter Foundation.

The author of the book is an experienced Smokejumper, firefighter with a big heart for his fellow firefighters.

Help us help him give back!
Simply click on the book cover below - the code WLFF will show on your receipt to help track your donation.

The direct link to donate to the Wildland Firefighter Foundation is: https://wffoundation.org/product/donate-online/

© Fri Feb 24 19:06:06 MST 2017
by Books To Believe In and Alaska Smokejumpers Welfare Fund